Benefits of Volunteering

Enhancing the Quality of Life, for as long as life lasts…

Connecticut Hospice is recognized internationally as a not-for-profit healthcare provider that originated hospice care in America with volunteers. For more than a quarter century Connecticut Hospice staff and volunteers have provided “around the clock” compassionate and expert care to patients and their families coping with an irreversible illness.
Volunteer in hospital and home environments…

American hospice care began with a home care program in New Haven in 1974, and when the needs of patients could no longer be met solely through home care, Connecticut Hospice opened the nation’s first hospice hospital in Branford, Connecticut in 1980. Today volunteers work alongside Connecticut Hospice staff members continuing to provide palliative care in Connecticut Hospice’s premier hospital in Branford, and in homes across Connecticut.

Share Connecticut Hospice with your community…

As a teaching and research institution under the John D. Thompson Hospice Institute, Connecticut Hospice shares its principles of palliative care with both professional and lay communities. Volunteers provide community outreach via the Institute’s Speakers Bureau bringing an overview of Connecticut Hospice’s healthcare programs to various civic groups throughout the year.

Join the Connecticut Hospice Team…

Hospice care relies on an interdisciplinary team approach of caregiving. A skilled team of staff and volunteers cater to the control of medical, social, psychological and spiritual symptoms of the patient and family. Volunteers bring comfort to patients and their families through their work in various areas such as medical care, pastoral care, social work, dietary, the arts, and bereavement.

Reach out to others…

Volunteers interact with patients and family members of all ages – infants, children, young adults and the elderly. There are volunteer opportunities to comfort, attend to, share a laugh, reassure, do something creative, treasure a memory, or spend quite time at a patient’s bedside – just being there so a patient never feels alone.

While hospice care is now recognized by major insurance plans, no one is turned away for lack of money. Contributions and a strong, well-trained and dedicated volunteer force help defray costs necessary to provide hospice care of the highest quality. Connecticut Hospice could not provide the level of hospice care it is known for without its volunteers. Hundreds of volunteers support and enhance hospice services provided by paid staff. Our volunteers are well known for their work, and have received national acclaim including a presidential award, under the 1,000 Points of Light Program.

 

Responding to needs, wherever they exist…

Connecticut Hospice volunteers themselves are a diverse and talented group. They include professionals from many areas, homemakers, retirees, and students. Connecticut Hospice works with local colleges to coordinate volunteerism with various community action programs. In addition to junior and senior high school and college levels, even grade school children “volunteer” for special projects like sending holiday cards and singing to patients and families.

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Share your time and talents…

Volunteer work is varied. No task is too big or too small. As patient and families needs change, so do volunteer opportunities. We make every effort to match your interests and talents with the needs of our patients and families. Connecticut Hospice defines the value of volunteerism by the comfort of our patients and families.

Four hours to change a life…

All new volunteers attend orientation and training with ongoing support from our staff and experienced volunteers. While we ask for a minimum 4 hour weekly commitment, we are flexible to meet your scheduling needs. Also, we can work with you or your organization for special one-time volunteer projects such as fund-raising or a holiday event.

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Give Back…

Volunteers come specifically to Connecticut Hospice for different reasons. Some remember a friend or family member who received hospice care and others want to explore new life experiences. Most volunteers express a desire to “give back” for a kindness they experienced within their lives. In addition, nearly all volunteers express that they find their reward in the privilege of serving others. We have a 1-year waiting period to volunteer after the death of a loved one.